Gas Processing & LNG is Produced by Gulf Publishing Holdings LLC



Russia and China prepare to launch first connecting natural gas pipeline

Russia and China prepare to launch the first natural gas pipeline to connect the two countries.

The 'Power of Siberia' pipeline, due to open on Dec. 2, will pipe natural gas around 3,000 km (1,865 miles) from Russia's Siberian fields to the fading industrial region, which has lagged the push to gas in China's south and east.

The pipeline - which will deliver gas under a 30-year, $400 billion deal signed in 2014 - has the potential to transform northeast China's energy landscape and even slow the country's surging imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG).

It will also make Russia a key supplier to China, to rival Turkmenistan and Australia, boosting ties amid Beijing's trade war with the United States.

More immediately, it poses a challenge for the sole marketer of the gas, China National Petroleum Corp (CNPC), or PetroChina, as it looks to drum up demand in the relatively sparsely populated region that has relied on coal for heating during sub-zero winters.

The pipeline will emerge in Heilongjiang, which borders Russia, and feed on to Jilin and Liaoning, China's top grain hub, where rust belt industries have long been overshadowed elsewhere.

The region's industry and 68 million city dwellers consume just 14 billion cubic meters (bcm) of gas a year, well below the 38 bcm the pipeline will deliver at full capacity by 2025.

Russia's Gazprom has said it expects to supply 4.6 bcm in 2020, rising to 10 bcm in 2021, 16 bcm in 2022, 21 bcm in 2023 and 25 bcm in 2024.

Neither PetroChina nor Gazprom has revealed the gas pricing terms, but Beijing-based analysts said the price is linked to crude oil or a basket of competing fuels.

The pipeline will cement China's spot as Russia's top export market and give Russia a potentially enormous new market outside Europe.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said trade between the neighbours would reach a record $100 billion this year, up from $87 billion in 2018. Moscow sees that figure rising to $200 billion by 2024 thanks in part to gas.

(Production: Maria Vasilyeva)


Copyright © 2019. All market data is provided by Barchart Solutions. Futures: at least a 10 minute delay. Information is provided 'as is' and solely for informational purposes, not for trading purposes or advice. To see all exchange delays and terms of use, please see disclaimer.

                                  CMEGroup                                     Icelogo

FEATURED COLUMNS

Business Trends: China pushes shale gas drilling amid corporate shakeups
-Adrienne Blume
In what appears to be a move to increase domestic energy production and self-reliance, as well as boost competition among foreign companies, China is reorganizing its state-owned energy firms and widening the invitation to shale gas drillers.
Editorial Comment: A brighter future for methane hydrates?
-Adrienne Blume
Methane hydrates are three-dimensional ice-lattice structures in which natural gas is trapped.
Executive Viewpoint: Innovative DCS targets biogas, LNG applications
-Jani Hautaluoma
New technologies, both process and digital, are revitalizing the hydrocarbon processing industry. Gas Processing & LNG talked with Jani Hautaluoma, Director of Process Automation for Valmet Automation, about the application of new production processes and digital advances for biogas and LNG production.


Best Practices in Supporting Front Line HPI Operations Remotely in Response to Covid-19

Register Now

To ensure employee safety, HPI companies had to quickly pivot to a remote support model with many subject matter experts (SMEs) and engineering staff working remotely supporting front line, sequestered critical operations and field operators.

What are the best practices and lessons learned from this new remote operational support model? What have been technologies and work processes that are enabling effective and efficient remote operational support? Is this the “new norm” going forward even when the impact of Covid-19 abates? If not, how will remote support of critical operations be changed?

If this topic and questions are of interest to you and your organization, please attend this special HPI webinar with a panel of leading industry customer experts who will discuss their perspectives. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions for the panelists.

May 18, 2020 10:00 AM CDT

Register Now

 

Please read our Term and Conditions, Cookies Policy, and Privacy Policy before using the site. All material subject to strictly enforced copyright laws.
© 2020 Gulf Publishing Holdings LLC.